Volume 14, Issue 2 (Summer 2013)                   Vol. , No. , Season & Year , Serial No. | Back to browse issues page


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Layeghi F, Hosseini S A, Farzad M, Zanghaei A. Comparison of Early Active Tension and Immobilization Protocols in Rehabilitation of the Hand, Following Zone 5-6 Extensor Tendon Repair. Archives of Rehabilitation. 2013; 14 (2) :77-85
URL: http://rehabilitationj.uswr.ac.ir/article-1-1212-en.html

1- Hand Surgeon, Assistant Professor University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences
2- Ph.D. of Occupational Therapy, Associate Professor University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences
3- Ph.D. Candidate of Occupational Therapy University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences
4- M.Sc. of Occupational Therapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , amin.uswr@yahoo.com
Abstract:   (7015 Views)

Objective: The objective of the study was to assess and compare Early Active Tension and Immobilization Protocols in Rehabilitation of the Hand, Following Zone 5-6 Extensor Tendon Repair.

Materials & Methods: From the 21 patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial study, 18 cases with average age of 32. 43 years completed the protocol. A total of 41 extensor tendons from 27 fingers of the subjects were studied. A surgeon repaired all tendons in zone 5 and/or 6 by an end to end epitenon running technique using prolen 0.3. For rehabilitation, subjects were randomly assigned into two “Immobilization” and “early active tension” group. Edema, metacarpophalangeal flexion, combined flexion and extension of wrist and fingers, total active motion of fingers and metacarpal extensor lag were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. All aforementioned variables and grip strength were reassessed 12 weeks after surgery.

Results: Compared to traditional immobilization protocol, early active tension could significantly improve hand edema, metacarpal flexion, combined flexion and extension of wrist and fingers, total active motion of fingers and grip strength (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in combined wrist and finger extension, and extensor lag between two groups (P>0.05).

Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that in compliant patients, early active tension could be an alternative method for traditional immobilization protocol, after surgical repair of extensor tendon injuries in zone 5 and/or 6.

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Type of Study: Original | Subject: Occupational Therapy
Received: 3/12/2012 | Accepted: 7/10/2013 | Published: 7/10/2013

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